Thursday, February 28, 2013

Fair enough

Indeed, the sanding is getting old. But it's about over. We faired out the decks yesterday and sanded the bejeezus out of them one more time this morning. Ready for paint as soon as it arrives.


But for a breath of fresh air, we rolled her today, filled all the screw holes, and got after some serious glassing.


Twenty ounces on the exterior walls and another thirty on the chines. The floor will wrap around the chines as well, adding another forty ounces or so to the chines, which in addition to the similar buildup on the inside, gives us some mighty beefy chines. But as we know, our friendly Southwest rivers have some pretty beefy current and some very beefy rocks.



Bottom glassing party Saturday afternoon. You're all invited!

3 comments:

  1. "Twenty ounces on the exterior walls and another thirty on the chines. The floor will wrap around the chines as well, adding another forty ounces or so to the chines, which in addition to the similar buildup on the inside, gives us some mighty beefy chines."

    90 oz of glass on the interior AND exterior chines, I like it, I don't even think you can call that "beefy" I think you need to call is muskoxen-y or something tuffer.

    Aside from the plain weave on the side panels, is that all biaxial?

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  2. One layer of the floor, both inside and out, is "25.3 oz./yd.², +45°/-45° Double Bias W/Mat,". It is a heavy biax with a thin mat backing, which makes it just about impossible to peel off the wood, like woven fabrics have an annoying tendency to do. Go ahead, make my day.

    But I would hazard a guess that about 90% of damage in Grand Canyon woodies is chine hits, so that's where the musk ox meat goes.

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  3. Brad, I've always lean to the side of extra engineering. It saves on being 100 miles deep in GC and wondering what and why it happened.

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